Other Documents I - REJECTED SCRIPTURES LETTERS OF CHRIST AND ABGARUS Eusebius in his Ecclesiastical History (i. 13) says he extracted these letters from the archives of Edessa relating to Abgar and translated them from Syriac word for word. Bible verses related to Rejection from the King James Version (KJV) by Relevance - Sort By Book Order Psalms 34:17-20 - The righteous cry, and the LORD heareth, and delivereth them out of all their troubles. Alternate title: The Epistle To Diognetus c. P3d download for windows 10. The Epistle to Diognetus is a well-crafted argument extolling the virtues of Christianity over paganism. It is difficult to determine the date of the letter, for it was never referred to in any known ancient writings, but it obviously dates from a period when Christianity was still regarded as a 'mystery' religion.

λεγει verb - present active indicative - third person singular
lego leg'-o: ask, bid, boast, call, describe, give out, name, put forth, say(-ing, on), shew, speak, tell, utter.αυτοις personal pronoun - dative plural masculine
autos ow-tos': the reflexive pronoun self, used of the third person , and (with the proper personal pronoun) of the other personsο definite article - nominative singular masculine
ho ho:

Other Documents Rejected Scriptures John Hagee

the definite article; the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom) -- the, this, that, one, he, she, it, etc.ιησους noun - nominative singular masculine
Iesous ee-ay-sooce': Jesus (i.e. Jehoshua), the name of our Lord and two (three) other Israelites -- Jesus.ουδεποτε adverb
oudepote oo-dep'-ot-eh: not even at any time, i.e. never at all -- neither at any time, never, nothing at any time.ανεγνωτε verb - second aorist active indicative - second person
anaginosko an-ag-in-oce'-ko: to know again, i.e. (by extension) to read -- read.εν preposition
en en: in, at, (up-)on, by, etc.ταις definite article - dative plural feminine
ho ho: the definite article; the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom) -- the, this, that, one, he, she, it, etc.γραφαις noun - dative plural feminine
graphe graf-ay': a document, i.e. holy Writ (or its contents or a statement in it) -- scripture.λιθον noun - accusative singular masculine
lithos lee'-thos: a stone -- (mill-, stumbling-)stone.ον relative pronoun - accusative singular masculine
hos hos: the relatively (sometimes demonstrative) pronoun, who, which, what, that -- one, (an-, the) other, some, that, what, which, who(-m, -se), etc. απεδοκιμασαν verb - aorist active indicative - third person
apodokimazo ap-od-ok-ee-mad'-zo: to disapprove, i.e. (by implication) to repudiate -- disallow, reject.οι definite article - nominative plural masculine
ho ho: the definite article; the (sometimes to be supplied, at others omitted, in English idiom) -- the, this, that, one, he, she, it, etc.οικοδομουντες verb - present active participle - nominative plural masculine
oikodomeo oy-kod-om-eh'-o: to be a house-builder, i.e. construct or (figuratively) confirm -- (be in) build(-er, -ing, up), edify, embolden.ουτος demonstrative pronoun - nominative singular masculine
houtos hoo'-tos: the he (she or it), i.e. this or that (often with article repeated) -- he (it was that), hereof, it, she, such as, the same, these, they, this (man, same, woman), which, who.εγενηθη verb - aorist passive deponent indicative - third person singular
ginomai ghin'-om-ahee: to cause to be (gen-erate), i.e. (reflexively) to become (come into being), used with great latitude (literal, figurative, intensive, etc.)εις preposition
eis ice: to or into (indicating the point reached or entered), of place, time, or (figuratively) purpose (result, etc.); also in adverbial phrasesκεφαλην noun - accusative singular feminine

Other Documents Rejected Scriptures Verses


kephale kef-al-ay': the head (as the part most readily taken hold of), literally or figuratively -- head.γωνιας noun - genitive singular feminine
gonia go-nee'-ah: an angle -- corner, quarter.παρα preposition
para par-ah': near; i.e. (with genitive case) from beside, (with dative case) at (or in) the vicinity of (objectively or subjectively), (with accusative case) to the proximity with κυριου noun - genitive singular masculine
kurios koo'-ree-os: supreme in authority, i.e. (as noun) controller; by implication, Master (as a respectful title) -- God, Lord, master, Sir.εγενετο verb - second aorist middle deponent indicative - third person singular
ginomai ghin'-om-ahee:

Other Documents Rejected Scriptures Fulfilled

to cause to be (gen-erate), i.e. (reflexively) to become (come into being), used with great latitude (literal, figurative, intensive, etc.)αυτη demonstrative pronoun - nominative singular feminine
houtos hoo'-tos: the he (she or it), i.e. this or that (often with article repeated) -- he (it was that), hereof, it, she, such as, the same, these, they, this (man, same, woman), which, who.και conjunction
kai kahee: and, also, even, so then, too, etc.; often used in connection (or composition) with other particles or small wordsεστιν verb - present indicative - third person singular
esti es-tee': he (she or it) is; also (with neuter plural) they areθαυμαστη adjective - nominative singular feminine
thaumastos thow-mas-tos': wondered at, i.e. (by implication) wonderful -- marvel(-lous).Rejectedεν preposition
en en: in, at, (up-)on, by, etc.οφθαλμοις noun - dative plural masculine
ophthalmos of-thal-mos': the eye; by implication, vision; figuratively, envy (from the jealous side-glance) -- eye, sight.ημων personal pronoun - first person genitive plural
hemon hay-mone': of (or from) us -- our (company), us, we.
Parallel Verses
New American Standard Bible

Other Documents Rejected Scriptures Submitted


Jesus said to them, 'Did you never read in the Scriptures, 'THE STONE WHICH THE BUILDERS REJECTED, THIS BECAME THE CHIEF CORNER stone; THIS CAME ABOUT FROM THE LORD, AND IT IS MARVELOUS IN OUR EYES '?

Other Documents Rejected Scriptures Lds

King James Bible
Jesus saith unto them, Did ye never read in the scriptures, The stone which the builders rejected, the same is become the head of the corner: this is the Lord's doing, and it is marvellous in our eyes?
Holman Christian Standard Bible
Jesus said to them, 'Have you never read in the Scriptures: The stone that the builders rejected has become the cornerstone. This came from the Lord and is wonderful in our eyes?
International Standard Version
Jesus asked them, 'Have you never read in the Scriptures, 'The stone that the builders rejected has become the cornerstone. This was the Lord's doing, and it is amazing in our eyes.'?

Other Documents Rejected Scriptures Study

NET Bible
Jesus said to them, 'Have you never read in the scriptures: 'The stone the builders rejected has become the cornerstone. This is from the Lord, and it is marvelous in our eyes'?
Aramaic Bible in Plain English
Yeshua said to them, “Have you never read in the scriptures, 'The stone which the builders rejected has become the head of the corner; this was from the presence of THE LORD JEHOVAH, and it is a wonder in our eyes?”
GOD'S WORD® Translation
Jesus asked them, 'Have you never read in the Scriptures: 'The stone that the builders rejected has become the cornerstone. The Lord is responsible for this, and it is amazing for us to see'?
King James 2000 Bible
Jesus said unto them, Did you never read in the scriptures, The stone which the builders rejected, the same has become the head of the corner: this is the Lord's doing, and it is marvelous in our eyes?Matthew 21:42
Matthew 21:42 NIV
Matthew 21:42 NLT
Matthew 21:42 ESV
Matthew 21:42 NASB
Matthew 21:42 KJV

The 39 books of the Old Testament and the 27 books of the New Testament are the only writings Christians consider fully inspired. The books that are in our present Old Testament were universally accepted at the time of Christ and endorsed by Him. In fact, there are nearly 300 quotations from the Old Testament books in the New Testament.

A number of books that are considered valuable but not inspired are found in the Roman Catholic and Anglican Bibles. These books are called the Apocrypha (which means “hidden,” “secret,” or “profound”). The Apocrypha was accepted by the council of Carthage, but was not accepted by many important church leaders, including Melito of Sardis, Tertullian, Origen, Athanasius, Cyril of Jerusalem, Epiphanius, Gregory of Nazianzus, Basil the Great, John Chrysostom, and Jerome. 1

Although the New Testament Canon was officially confirmed in its present and final form by the third council of Carthage in 397, the 27 documents it contains were accepted as authoritative from the very beginning.

The New Testament is solidly rooted in history. It revolves around the death, burial, and the resurrection of Jesus Christ. Not even the rationalist critics of the 19th century could find reason to question Pauline authorship of 1 Corinthians, and it has been acknowledged as the earliest written testimony of Christ’s resurrection. In 1 Corinthians 15 Paul declared:

For if the dead are not raised, not even Christ has been raised; and if Christ has not been rasied, your faith is worthless, you are still in your sins. Then those also who have fallen asleep in Christ have perished. If we have hope in Christ in this life only, we are of all men most to be pitied (vv. 16-19).

First-century Christians circulated documents—either written or approved by the apostles—which contained an authoritative explanation of the accounts concerning Jesus’ life and teaching. These documents often quoted from each other and presented the same gospel message from different perspectives and in different styles. Hundreds of other documents were written and circulated, but the church quickly rejected spurious documents and established the authority of those that were genuine.

  1. “Augustine alone of ancient authors, and the councils of Africa which he dominated, present a different picture. Augustine specifically accepted the apocryphal books and gives the total number as forty-four. He is the only ancient author who gives a number different from the twenty-two or twenty-four book reckoning. The list includes Tobit, Judith, 1 and 2 Maccabees, 1 Esdras (the book composed of part of 2 Chronicles, Ezra, and Nehemiah), Wisdom of Solomon, and Ecclesiasticus. The Local councils of Carthage and Hippo, dominated by Augustine, included the same books. This listing prob. agreed with the ideas of Pope Damasus who dominated the local council of Rome at 382. It will be remembered that it was Damasus who urged Jerome to translate also the apocryphal books for his Vulgate. Jerome did so with the explicit declaration that they were not canonical.
    “Green (op. cit. 168-174) discusses the witness of Augustine and points out that Augustine seems to vacillate. Green quotes Augustine; ‘What is written in the book of Judith the Jews are truly said not to have received into the canon of Scripture’ (Augustine, City of God xviii, 260). ‘After Malachi, Haggai, Zechariah, and Ezra, they had no prophets until the advent of the Savior’ (id. xvii, last ch.). He was well aware that Maccabees were after the cessation of prophecy. Green concludes that Augustine was using ‘canonical’ in the sense of books which may be read in the churches without putting them all on an equal plane.” Excerpted from an article by R.L. Harris (“Canon of the Old Testament”) in the Zondervan Pictorial Encyclopedia of the Bible.Back To Article
Coments are closed
Scroll to top