Panama - Panama - World War II and mid-century intrigues: Before the United States became embroiled in World War II, it requested defense sites outside the Canal Zone for landing fields, roads, antiaircraft batteries, and warning stations. Arias, who openly sympathized with fascism, demanded compensation in the form of cash and the transfer to Panama of various properties. 20th-century establishments in Panama‎ (10 C) 0–9 1900s in Panama‎ (5 C, 3 P) 1910s in Panama‎ (7 C) 1920s in Panama‎ (6 C).

Before the United States became embroiled in World War II, it requested defense sites outside the Canal Zone for landing fields, roads, antiaircraft batteries, and warning stations. Arias, who openly sympathized with fascism, demanded compensation in the form of cash and the transfer to Panama of various properties. While in Havana, Cuba, on a private visit, he was removed from office by the national police (Panama had no army) in October 1941, and Ricardo Adolfo de la Guardia became president. After the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, on December 7, 1941, Panama transferred the defense sites to the United States, and tens of thousands of U.S. troops were stationed there to guarantee the security of the canal. While the waterway was never actually attacked, Japan had planned to do so, intending to use aircraft launched from submarines; however, the war ended before this effort could be mounted.

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During and after the war the United States eventually returned 98 defense sites to Panama but continued negotiations on 36 others. The Panamanian government finally agreed to lease the sites, but the Panamanian National Assembly, influenced by the threat of mob violence, rejected the proposals. The United States abandoned the additional bases in 1947.

Since 1920 the Ruiz family has been growing and processing some of the finest coffee Panama has to offer. For three generations the Ruiz family has transformed what used to be a single-family farm into a specialty enterprise that also processes, packages and roasts. Over the years, Casa Ruiz has earned a reputation for quality, and consistency. Exploring Panamanian Culture. Panama links Central and South America and is a bridge between the Atlantic and the Pacific Oceans. Geographically, it is part of Central America, but Panama culture has been historically influenced by the Caribbean and South America.

In 1945 the National Assembly put an end to the regime of de la Guardia, sent him into exile, and selected the ambassador to Washington, Enrique A. Jiménez, as president. In the presidential elections of 1948 Domingo Díaz Arosemena was declared the winner by the National Jury of Elections, depriving Arnulfo Arias of a victory. Díaz died in office in 1949, and, under a mountain of popular protests, his two vice presidents first accepted and then refused office. This action cleared the way for a bizarre maneuver by the election jury, which declared that, after a recount, Arias had won the presidency in 1948. Politics throughout this period were dominated by Colonel José Antonio Remón Cantera, commander of the increasingly militarized police, which became known as the National Guard.

In 1951 former president de la Guardia returned from exile and began to challenge the government. In May there was a run on the Federal Trust Company savings bank, which was subsequently closed; de la Guardia protested the closing and was therefore arrested. Then on May 10 Colonel Remón turned against Arias, who was overthrown, and Vice President Alcibíades Arosemena assumed power the following day. Remón won the presidential election of 1952 but was assassinated in January 1955.

The year 1955 was also notable for the flow of capital into Panama, including a loan from the World Bank that supported work on the Inter-American Highway and on local roads. But martial law was imposed in 1958 following student riots against the regime of Ernesto de la Guardia (elected in 1956) and against the United States. There were more disturbances during the first four months of 1959, and on Independence Day men said to have been students marched into the Canal Zone to raise the Panamanian flag. The police turned them back.

In the presidential election of 1960, Roberto F. Chiari emerged victorious. Despite a national debt of about $83 million and a budget deficit of some $10 million, he plunged into a vast program of slum clearance, housing, hospital construction, and health service. Arnulfo Arias also championed those efforts, and he became a front-runner in the presidential election of 1964; however, the National Guard intimidated voters who wished to support Arias, and the former secretary to the National Guard, Marco A. Robles, was declared the winner. Under Robles the economy of Panama was uneven. In January 1964 anti-U.S. riots were sparked when high school students in the Canal Zone used force to prevent the display of the Panamanian flag. In response to this action, Panama broke relations with the United States and attempted to take the dispute to the United Nations (UN) Security Council. These events led to reduced income from the Canal Zone and worried foreign investors, and unemployment became a serious problem. Eventually the United States agreed to renegotiate the Canal treaties, including setting a date for Panama to assume control over the canal and the adjacent Canal Zone. There were additional disorders in March and May 1968, when Arias, a presidential candidate, with his followers in control of the National Assembly, unsuccessfully attempted to impeach Robles.

Arias won the election, but after 11 days in office he was removed from power by the National Guard, which took control of the government. A ruling junta then instituted censorship of the press, suspended constitutional guarantees, and dissolved the National Assembly.

Panama
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  • People
  • Economy
    • Finance, trade, and services
    • Transportation and telecommunications
  • Government and society
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  • History
    • The Republic of Panama
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Panama 1920 Kitsempty Spaces The Blog -

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Articles from Britannica Encyclopedias for elementary and high school students.
Burton L. GordonSee All Contributors
Emeritus Professor of Geography, San Francisco State University. Author of A Panama Forest and Shore and others.

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Alternative Titles: República de Panamá, Republic of Panama

Panama, country of Central America located on the Isthmus of Panama, the narrow bridge of land that connects North and South America. Embracing the isthmus and more than 1,600 islands off its Atlantic and Pacific coasts, the tropical nation is renowned as the site of the Panama Canal, which cuts through its midsection. English speaking with idioms course freeielts document. It is equally well known for its natural beauty, for its diverse plant and animal life, including hundreds of bird and tree species, and for its vibrant music and culture.

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The home of several Native American peoples, such as the Guaymí, Kuna, and Chocó, Panama became the first Spanish colony on the Pacific. Celebrated as “the door to the seas and key to the universe,” it served in the 1530s as the staging point for the Spanish conquest of the Inca empire, and until the 19th century it was a transshipment point for gold and silver destined for Spain. With the independence of Colombia, which once controlled Panama, from Spain, Panama came to serve as another staging point, this time for oceangoing migrants to the gold fields of California.

Since 1914 the 51-mile- (82-km-) long Panama Canal, which connects the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans, has afforded a long-sought shortcut for shipping and assures the country’s standing as one of the most strategic transportation hubs of the world. The canal also secures Panama’s ongoing role in international affairs and world commerce. The United States relinquished jurisdiction of the Panama Canal on December 31, 1999, marking an unprecedented shift in Panamanian society. For the first time in nearly a century as an independent nation, Panama controlled the entirety of its national territory.

Panama enjoys a lively mix of cultural influences, expressed in the country’s cuisine, artwork, music, and literature. Its capital, Panama City, is located on the Pacific coast just east of the canal. A cosmopolitan city where skyscrapers tower above whitewashed bungalows, it enjoys a handsome setting and a growing importance as a commercial and financial services centre for the region. However, its economic progress has been hampered periodically by environmental problems and political turmoil.

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Land

Relief

Panama is bounded to the north by the Caribbean Sea (an extension of the Atlantic Ocean) and to the south by the Pacific Ocean. It has an elongated S shape, with its Caribbean coastline stretching some 800 miles (1,290 km) and the Pacific coast some 1,060 miles (1,700 km); however, a line drawn from the Costa Rican frontier in the west to the Colombian border in the east would extend only 480 miles (770 km). The shortest distance across the isthmus is about 30 miles (50 km), from the mouth of the Nergalá (Necategua) River, which flows into the Gulf of San Blas on the Caribbean shore, to the mouth of the Chepo River on the Pacific coast. Nearly as narrow is the portion of the isthmus traversed by the Panama Canal.

A central spine of mountain ranges extends almost the entire length of Panama, dividing the country into Atlantic- and Pacific-facing slopes. The two principal ranges, the Tabasará Mountains (Cordillera Central) in the west and the Cordillera de San Blas in the east, are separated near the centre of the country by a saddle of lower land. This depression (the Panama Canal site) divides the country again—roughly into western and eastern halves. Of the four quadrants thus formed, the southwestern has the largest number of settlements; however, the environs of the canal account for most of Panama’s population and commerce. The country’s highest peak is an inactive volcano, Barú (Chiriquí), which reaches an elevation of 11,401 feet (3,475 metres).

Paralleling the principal mountain chains, a lower mountain arc extends along Panama’s southern coast. It appears only in well-separated segments—for example, on Azuero Peninsula as the Canajagua Massif and in eastern Panama as the Sierra de Jungurudó, Sapo Mountains, and the Majé Mountains. The highlands and mountains are made up primarily of igneous (volcanic) rocks.

The lowlands include the plains of Panamá and Chiriquí provinces, the plains and hills of Colón province, the Chepo and Chucunaque river basins in the east, and the narrow northeastern plains of the Caribbean region. Sedimentary rocks such as slates and shales underlie most of the lowland zones.

The Pacific coastline is extended by the Azuero Peninsula and the Gulf of Panama and by numerous headlands and bays, whereas the largest embayment on the Caribbean side is Chiriquí Lagoon. The Pacific coastline is more indented and irregular, and its continental shelf is much wider than that on the Atlantic side. In addition, most of the republic’s more than 1,600 islands lie off its Pacific coast; they include the Perlas Archipelago (Pearl Islands) and the islands of Taboga, Cébaco, Parida, Jicarón, and Coiba, the largest. The principal archipelagoes off the Caribbean coast are those of Bocas del Toro and San Blas.

Drainage and soils

Of Panama’s many short rivers, those that flow to the Caribbean include the Sixaola, Changuinola, Indio, Cricamola, La Miel, and Chagres. Rivers flowing to the Pacific include the Chiriquí Viejo, Santa María, Chepo, Chucunaque, and Tuira. During the rainy season the Tuira is navigable for some 40 miles (60 km) and the Chepo for 20 miles (30 km). Water in the Panama Canal does not flow from coast to coast; rather, it is released from the rain-fed Gatún and Alajuela (Madden) lakes in the central highlands. In effect, the water flows to both coasts simultaneously via the canal’s system of locks and dams. For details on the engineering and operation of the waterway, seePanama Canal.

Soils are commonly reddish to brown and rich in clay. They vary in fertility, and in many areas crops can be grown continuously only if fertilizers are applied. On poorer soils, a shifting subsistence agriculture is practiced. Under this system small plots are cleared, cropped for a few years, then abandoned until their natural fertility is restored—a practice called roza in Panama.

Areas of alluvial soils (which develop from clay, silt, sand, and gravel deposited by streams) are especially fertile but are limited to the lower parts of river valleys. The commercial banana plantations around Puerto Armuelles and in western Bocas del Toro province are mainly on alluvial soils. Some of the soils along the inland edges of coastal mangrove swamps have also proved productive. In some areas, exceptionally fertile soils have developed from volcanic ash.

National anthem of Panama
Official name
República de Panamá (Republic of Panama)
Form of government
multiparty republic with one legislative house (National Assembly [71])
Head of state and government
President: Laurentino Cortizo
Capital
Panama City
Official language
Spanish
Official religion
none
Monetary unit
balboa (B)
Population
(2019 est.) 4,227,000
Population rank
(2019) 129
Population projection 2030
4,842,000
Total area (sq mi)
29,081
Total area (sq km)
75,320
Density: persons per sq mi
(2018) 143.2
Density: persons per sq km
(2018) 55.3
Urban-rural population
Urban: (2018) 67.7%
Rural: (2018) 32.3%
Life expectancy at birth
Male: (2017) 75.3 years
Female: (2017) 81.3 years
Literacy: percentage of population age 15 and over literate
Male: (2015) 95.7%
Female: (2015) 94.5%
GNI (U.S.$ ’000,000)
(2017) 53,672
GNI per capita (U.S.$)
(2017) 13,100
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